Insufficient evidence on vitamin D and the risk of acute respiratory tract infections (ARTIs) and COVID-19.

There is a new update from Scientific Advisory Commission on Nutrition (SACN) and the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) concerning Vitamin D

  • there is insufficient evidence on the role of vitamin D and risk of respiratory tract infections
  • PHESACN and NICE will continue to monitor and assess emerging evidence in this field
  • current UK government advice to take a daily 10 microgram vitamin D supplement to protect musculoskeletal health still applies

Vitamin D is needed to keep bones and muscles healthy. It has also been suggested that vitamin D could reduce the risk of Acute Respiratory Tract Infections (ARTIs) and COVID-19.

This has been explored in 2 new rapid reviews, published 01 July 2020, from the Scientific Advisory Commission on Nutrition (SACN) and the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE). Public Health England (PHE) commissioned SACN to examine new evidence on whether vitamin D supplementation could reduce the risk of ARTIs and supported NICE to review emerging evidence on vitamin D and the prevention and treatment of COVID-19.

Further reading is via links below.

Impact on BAME groups

Existing advice highlights that people who have dark skin, for example with an African, African-Caribbean or south Asian background, may not get enough vitamin D from sunlight and it is recommended that they consider taking a daily supplement containing 10 micrograms of vitamin D throughout the year.

The SACN 2016 review found a lack of available evidence on the role of vitamin D in Black, Asian and Minority Ethnic groups, with the report recommending that further research is undertaken on “whether there are differences in dietary vitamin D requirements of ethnic groups in the UK”.

We look forward being able to talk about the facts surrounding Vitamin D and its role as a nutrient in food supplements.

Register for the 14 July Webinar

Join us online for our next Food Supplements Special Interest Group (SIG) to hear about how Vitamin D continues to be a nutrient that dominates the media headlines, whether due to nutritional deficiency, national guidelines to supplement or as a panacea for good health.
Register here
Janet Worrell